A journey in textiles and color

Winner of chosen paths and remover of obstacles - Ganesha

Winner of chosen paths and remover of obstacles - Ganesha
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Ganesha, the elephant headed Hindu god, is the son of Lord Shiva and Goddess Parvati. Also known as Ganapati, Vinayaka, and Pillaiyar, he is a universal god, and many worship him regardless of religious affiliation.*  Since he is the god of beginnings, many rituals start with a prayer to Ganesha. Most common depictions of Ganesha include a pot belly, a broken tusk and four arms, three of them holding an elephant goad, a rope and a sweetmeat. His lower right hand is in a blessing mudra (symbolic hand gesture). Legend is that Ganesha broke this tusk to write down the Mahabharata - one of two Sanskrit epics of ancient India. Ganesha also has a tiny pet vehicle, a mouse.

 

Ganesha painting kalamkari style

Ganesha painting Kalamkari style

 Symbolism of Ganesha

  • Goad - helps steer you away from ignorance just like a mahout would steer an elephant from a treacherous path
  • Rope - helps remove obstacles and pulls you closer to your spiritual path
  • Sweetmeat - a sweet reward for a life well lived
  • Mudra - blessings and protection as you journey through life
  • Broken tusk - symbolizes sacrifice for a good cause, to urge you to keep the good and throw away the bad
  • Mouse - to help you overcome fear, indecision and anxiety

Tanjore painting of Ganesha British museum

Ganesha painting Tanjore style with perm British Museum

 

Ganesh Chaturthi is an annual festival which honors Ganesha and is celebrated in late summer.  I fondly recall the ritual of shopping for a clay idol of Ganesha at the bazaar the evening before Ganesh Chaturthi, to symbolize  welcoming Ganesha into our homes. We then enjoyed decorating the clay statue and eating yummy kolukattai (sweetmeats). On the third day we immersed the statue in the well behind our house (clay is returned back to earth).  In many parts of India the festival is celebrated for 10 days.

ganesh chathurthi celebrated with lightsclay Ganesha

 

How did Ganesha get his elephant head?

Ganesha’s story starts with Shiva’s return from his journey to resolve disorder in the world. When Parvati heard about her beloved Shiva’s return, she prepares to welcome him and gets ready to bathe. Since there were no guards available she crafted a boy from turmeric sandalwood paste, named him Ganesha, and told him not to let anyone disturb her.  When Shiva arrived, Ganesha did not recognize him and therefore did not let him pass by. In anger, Shiva chopped off the boy’s head. Parvathi was inconsolable at the loss of her child, so Shiva sent his ganas (attendants) to find a replacement head. They searched for the first living thing sleeping with its head lying to the north (devotees of Shiva look towards his abode in Mt. Kailash in the north).  The ganas returned with the head of an elephant, and Shiva used this head to reconstruct Ganesha - leader of ganas.

Since then, he has been revered as the god of success and remover of obstacles; and is regarded as the guiding force behind intellect, learning and wisdom.

 

reclining Ganesha carved in stone

 

In my family, we call upon Ganesha as our guide whenever we start something new. We pray to Ganesha when we face obstacles and remember that all will be well in the future. A few years ago, as I explored my roots my aunt told me about our ancestral Vinayagar temple in Kottar, Nagercoil, Tamil Nadu. This temple, which my great grandfather was instrumental in building, is called sendra thisai vendra vinayagar koil (winner of all chosen paths and directions). It’s my favorite now, and I visit every time I travel to India.  This temple of my ancestors makes me feel that Ganesha is with me whichever direction my life takes me. 

 

Ganesha winner of all chosen paths and obstacle remover

Sendra thisai vendra vinyagar thirukoil
 winner of all chosen directions Vinyagar koil in kottar Nagercoil

 

Send someone a Ganesha to wish them well as they begin a new journey. Send a Ganesha to offer wisdom and well wishes.  Click images below to shop.

 

painted wooden ganesha wall hanging
Painted wooden Ganesha wall hanging

 

ganesha jewelry by mayil
Ganesha jewelry by Mayil

 

wish someone good luck with a Ganesha charm mayil wrist wrap
Ganesha charm wrist wrap - gifts by Mayil

 

*our very famous Patriots quarter back is rumored to have a picture of Ganesha in his locker.

 

7 comments


Irene Vedamurthy

Irene Vedamurthy

What a wonderful and informative read :) I am in love with your pendant collection.

Cordelia Gardner

Cordelia Gardner

I have heard about ganesha and enjoyed the story of how he got his head. Figurines are beautiful and I purchased one for my daughter who loves it. It’s a unique gift idea.
Thank you

Rekha Gopalan

Rekha Gopalan

Lovely write up. Your collection is beautiful and unique – loved the padlock with Ganesha. Who would dare open that lock with Ganesha guarding it ?

Nai

Nai

A lovely article, I learned a lot from it! Will definitely peruse to find a Ganesha for myself! :)

Anjali Agarwal

Anjali Agarwal

Beautiful write up on one of my favorite guys- Lord Ganesha :)
A little side note, when they craft the Ganesh images care is always taken to make sure the trunk swings to the left. However the most famous Ganesh temple in Mumbai, the Siddhi Vinayak Temple, the ancient small Murti has the Lord’s Trunk swinging to the right, and the temple beholds great veneration. In some rare anomalies one will find a rare Ganesh image with the trunk to the right and I have one, which my son gifted to me; he was 5 then, just picked it from a road side vendor. It treasure it for it was given to me by my son, who knew very little about religion then, he just wanted to give me something, and he happened to pick this one from many, probably made by some simple rural folk somewhere in India.

Love you collections Madavi,waiting for my yellow bracelet.

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